Changing Dark Bag and Home Developing

Discussion in 'Develop, Process and Print' started by Rob MacKillop, Oct 7, 2016.

  1. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Has anyone here used a black bag for getting film out of a roll and into a developing canister? Something like this: http://shop.silverprint.co.uk/Kaiser-Changing-Bag-27x30-Inch-6389/product/58476/K6389/

    And would something like this be a useful investment: http://shop.silverprint.co.uk/Paterson-Film-Processing-Kit/product/1775/PTP573/

    Not for me, of course, but Susan might be interested in developing her own (and my!) film. We can't have a darkroom.

    Once the film is developed and dried, I suppose we would have to scan the negs, as enlargers are expensive. We're trying to save money, and sending film off (non C41) is very expensive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2016
  2. Brian Moore

    Brian Moore Moderator

    Yes.

    Yes.

    Rob I would recommend getting the largest capacity changing bag you can find. And although I started of with a two-roll canister like that Paterson one I eventually bought a 5 roll canister. So I can process 5 rolls of 35mm or 3 rolls of 120 at a time. However, the canisters are fairly cheap so you might want to start with a two-roll and move up to a larger one if you are developing enough film.

    You'd need a film scanner (or a scanning service you could send your negs to) not so much because enlargers are expensive but because the darkroom that you would need to be able to use your enlarger would be expensive.
     
  3. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Ive got that bag Rob and find it ok. The Patterson 35mm spiral can be split and re fixed to except 120mm roll film which is handy.
    Two items which are very handy is a cannister opener and film retriever which seems to be missing from the kit? useful to take the end of the film from the canister if it is wound back in, or if desperate the opener can open the canister. The retriever also means you can get the end of the film out prior to going into the bag where it is all done by feel once in there, slightly easier to do the initial bit outside the bag.
    Brian is the expert though.
     
  4. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Thanks, lads. But how easy is it to get the film out, and feed it into the large canister, while fumbling around in the bag? I assume all the chemicals would go into the canister before putting the film in?
     
  5. Dave Farnes

    Dave Farnes Well-Known Member

    You only need to load the film into the canister in the bag. The canister has a lightproof opening to enable the chemicals to be poured in and tipped out again
     
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  6. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    I did wonder if it did. Makes sense. Thanks, Dave.
     
  7. Dave Farnes

    Dave Farnes Well-Known Member

    You are welcome. I used to load films by draping a blanket over my head and standing in the airing cupboard. Once someone else pushed the door shut it was pitch black under the blanket.
     
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  8. Brian Moore

    Brian Moore Moderator

    I know some people do it this way but on the few occasions I've had to retrieve film from the canister (such as when accidentally winding unexposed film back inside it's canister) I found the film retrievers to be a bit of trial and error. (But maybe that's due to the design of the one I own.)

    To get exposed film out of the canister in the changing back I simply pop the end of the canister off with a bottle opener. It only takes a second and works flawlessly every time.
     
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  9. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Bottle opener? what's that :D
     
  10. Martin Carlin

    Martin Carlin Active Member

    Hi Rob The chemicals go in after the canister is light tight I use it all the time. As others have said its is quite simple. To save even more you can buy a bulk film loader and buy some bulk film then you can load that on special multi use film rolls which are easier to take your film out in the bag.
    Yea a scanner is the way to go I found the Epson, to be good. I normally get my supplies from these guys here http://www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk/film/bulk-b-w-film/c39-all Good luck it may take a while to get used too but will save you money in the long run.
     
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  11. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Thanks, lads, and nice to see you here again, Martin.

    "Retriever"? You mean I have to buy a dog as well?
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2016
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  12. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    A friend for life ;)
     
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  13. Martin Carlin

    Martin Carlin Active Member

    L
    Lol I personally have never used a dog (Retriever) and have never any trouble , a beer bottle opener has always done fine.
    It takes time to get used too loading the spirals but in no time you will be doing in your sleep. I used to practice with a old used film just to get the hang of it. It doesn't need to be a full roll either. The great thing with bulk film is you can load as much film as you want too on it for what your planning to shoot.
    If I can do it I'm sure you can Rob
     
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  14. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Oh, I'd love a dog, and I'd be the perfect owner - I work from home, and go for walkies every day. Alas, they give me asthma, even the supposedly non-allergenic types. But that's why I bought a camera, to give me something to do on my walks.
     
  15. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Well that is the exact same thing I tell people that my camera is my dog. Their expression go all quizzical at the thought. I gave up explaining a long time ago and they mostly leave me alone now :D
     
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  16. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

    It might be worth giving SDS a call. I am pretty sure he'd be able to sort you out with a mix of new and S/H stuff. Paul is a very nice and helpful chap. And another Paul, at Commercial Cameras, has some nice S/H darkroom stuff for sale (and he's a member of RPF). I'm not sure what he has left but there may well be some of what you want.

    http://www.secondhanddarkroom.co.uk

    http://www.commercialcameras.co.uk/index.html
     
  17. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Thanks, Pete.
     

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