Doronicum Orientali in the garden

Discussion in 'Flora' started by Shaun Haselden, May 4, 2020.

  1. Shaun Haselden

    Shaun Haselden Active Member

    Back in the 1970's I spent a great deal of my time photographing flowers and such like. Much later in years I started photographing wild flowers such as Arum Maculatum using medium format, winning numerous awards and trophies at local photographic society level. Here is a shot taken during the boredom of lockdown using a cheap Tamron zoom for it's low contrast imaging. I have toned it as in those early days I printed heavily onto Agfa Record Rapid for it's beautiful chlorobromide warmness. Medium/large format printed onto those old papers produced amazing photographic prints of incredible depth and tone the like of which I think we shall not see again.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Shaun Haselden

    Shaun Haselden Active Member

    Another shot of poppy buds early in the year. This one was shot using a Samyang 85mm f1.4 lens but with the camera in DX mode. For me, this is just too sharp.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

    A agree, the softer tones of the first work so much better.
     
    Shaun Haselden likes this.
  4. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Oh, that first one is just perfection.
     
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  5. Shaun Haselden

    Shaun Haselden Active Member

    Thank you guys. Rob all I try to do is to mimic a collection of photographic images I saw back in the 80's taken by Blakemore. He had a few on show that he had taken in New Zealand using 5X4 sheet film with low contrast and that is where I found it; low contrast with delicate tones using cheap lenses. I could well be wrong but I find that modern lenses (most but not all) have the most ridiculously high contrast and sharpness especially for certain types of shooting.
     
    Rob MacKillop likes this.

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