HDR Photography - Photography or not?

Discussion in 'Landscape and Architecture' started by Robert L. Bishop, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Darren Bradley

    Darren Bradley Active Member

    It looks like you're doing enfusion rather than classic HDR. Am I right? To each his own, I know, but I personally can't look at one of those hyper-processed HDR photos for more than about .0003 seconds before I get a piercing migraine right behind my eyes. But your photos don't look like that at all and I have to say, I very much like them. So whatever you did, Bravo, good sir!
     
  2. Robert L. Bishop

    Robert L. Bishop New Member

    If I am honest, I don't know what 'enfusion' is. I agree, I am not a massive fan of hyper-processed images. I do try to keep the photo as natural as possible.
     
  3. Darren Bradley

    Darren Bradley Active Member

    With "normal" HDR, an intermediate image needs to be created, and it also requires very complicated tone mapping of the various layers or you get the washed out images and bad halo effects that are a trademark of 99% of all HDR images you see out there. But since I didn't see any of that on your photos, I assumed that either you're really, really gifted at creating HDR images or you used a different method, called Exposure Fusion (also known as enfusion). This is more like what we used to do with film photography in the darkroom, where you simply layer images of different exposures to achieve a higher dynamic range. It provides a more natural look and is also halo free.
     
  4. Hamish Gill

    Hamish Gill Well-Known Member

    Wow wow wow ... Enfusion? HDR ... I thought it was the same thing?
    What do you mean by an intermediate image?
     
  5. Brian Moore

    Brian Moore Moderator

    Darren,...can this be simulated in the digital darkroom on film images that have been scanned? Thanks.
     
  6. Darren Bradley

    Darren Bradley Active Member

    For normal HDR as I understand it, an intermediate image is created, based on image data from a set of images with varying dynamic range. The intermediate image has a narrower dynamic range than the HDR image, but is generally more faithful to the real thing. The intermediate image is used to compare different tone mappings and colors for creating the final image. At least, that's how I learned it. Is that not what you do? Since I don't like the look achieved by HDR most of the time, I don't use this technique very often.

    For image fusion, you just merge overlapping images to quickly blend differently exposed images into an output image. I used to have to do this manually, but there are several computer programs available now that will do it. It has the benefit of maintaining natural colors and doesn't produce any halos. So it's more similar to what we used to do in the darkroom to blend multiple negatives into a single print. This technique can also be used to expand the DOF in an image, by blending focus stack of multiple images of the same subject, taken at different focal lengths or resolution. We use this technique with my work, when analyzing satellite or aerial imagery and other data into a single image or map (monochromatic satellite images frequently have sharper resolution than color, so you combine the two and presto!).

    As for using this technique on film images that have been scanned, I don't see why not. The scanned image you create is just an image file same as any other. You'd want to scan your images in RAW format for the best results, though.
     
  7. Hamish Gill

    Hamish Gill Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure ... I have only really used software that does it for me ...
    Thats blown my mind a bit really ... I have used photomatix which is touted as HDR software and Lightroom "enfuse" which I guess is somthing different then?

    As for scanning to raw ... Epson software doesn't do it!
    You would need a third party scan software
    Vuescan pro does it at $79.99 http://www.hamrick.com/

    Been on my shopping list for a while, so I'd be very interested to hear how you get on if you went down that road Brian!
     
  8. Darren Bradley

    Darren Bradley Active Member

    I've not used photomatix but I've read that it's capable of doing both kinds of HDR/fusion processing - although it's most well known for that classic HDR processing. LR/Enfuse does the latter, only. Technically, both are HDR since you are expanding the dynamic range on both methods.
     
  9. Hamish Gill

    Hamish Gill Well-Known Member

    More reading for Hamish required I feel :)
     
  10. Brian Moore

    Brian Moore Moderator

    I have a kid in college so I'd have to ask Santa and hope for the best.:eek:
     

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