John Moore's Boat Yard

Discussion in 'General' started by Julian de'Courcy, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    There are a few boat yards remaining in Cornwall whivh make traditional craft, or have the ability with the talented labour to to son. Even so it is a dying craft. Mevagissey has always had a boat yard. As a young boy it way Fraziers which existed from 1880s to 1968. The slip which launched the boats was and is still called Fraziers slip. When Farzier's closed and the building inevitably turned into holiday lets and tourist shops, John Moore originally from Cadgwith on the lizard peninsula opened up what is know the local boat yard. It is always of interest to watch a boat grow from the rough sawn timber which arrives by lorry and left on the quay side. To the trimming timber with what appears to be primitive axe's such as the adze, steamer to make the timber planks pliable enough to set along the ribs, onto the first coats of paint or varnish and the launching which is always a good event.
    So good to see.
    Took a couple of photos today. Main reason to try the new Sigma DP2 Merrill. Ordered from Clifton cameras Friday after lunch, arrived 9.30am this morning, post Free :) Good service me thinks.

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    JOHN MOORE'S BOAT YARD
    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr


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    JOHN MOORE'S BOAT YARD
    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr


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    JOHN MOORE'S BOAT YARD
    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr

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    JOHN MOORE'S BOAT YARD
    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr
     
  2. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

    Fabulous set Julian and gorgeous natural colour. You've put me to shame - I still haven't taken a single shot with my DP2!
     
  3. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Aw Pete I would of had it :D the DP2 that is. Thank you. I just like to have the focal view. I so pleased with the Merrils that I may go with the DP1 as well and then have 75mm, 45mm and 28mm.
    The Quottro is going to be expensive at least first off, so unless it is very special I wont bother. Don't quote me on that though :rolleyes:
     
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  4. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Julian, thanks for that back story, which I found very interesting. I think we could do with more of that type of thing here. The shots are superb, and I'm of a mind to bag myself one of those Merrills. Which would be the best for landscapes?
     
  5. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

    Either the DP2 or the DP1. Theoretically the DP1 but I think you might appreciate the longer focal length of the DP2.
     
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  6. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Thanks, Pete.
     
  7. Dan Cattermole

    Dan Cattermole Dan Down - The Steampunk Womble

    Nice one Julian... I may just take a visit there in June too... :)
    Brilliant report, and photos as usual.
     
    Julian de'Courcy likes this.
  8. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Thanks Rob.
    I had the thought about where to post these. Not being street or portrait. It did cross my mind of a thread that is purely social documentary. If there is such a thing.

    As regard to what Merrill for landscapes. It depends, I actually like telephoto lenses for some landscapes to foreshortening . Then at some scenes would love a wide angle, so shoot a few and stitch them. In short all three is ideal.
     
  9. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Do Dan, it is next door to the Museum. Thanks.
     
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  10. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Thanks, Julian. I'll just have to buy all three, then! Not going to happen, I'm sad to say. Maybe one of them. I'll probably keep prevaricating until all the sales ones have gone...
     
  11. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

  12. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    It was mentioned to me once to look at my own history of shooting landscapes and see at what focal length I chose most often and enjoyed to use, I definitely found I shot more over the 50mm, yet their are always those occasions when wider is needed.

    Always a hard decision. Just as well it is not that important.
     
  13. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Pete says DP1 or 2. Julian says 3. :) I love this forum!
     
  14. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Actually, I'd love a good portrait lens too. So maybe the DP3?
     
  15. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    No sorry I've got aDP3 but for some landscapes DP2 is best , or DP1 if needed :eek: runs for the trees and hides. Seriously these types of decisions I can never make , so buy the lot just in case:oops:

    I do remember buying the OM-D and had a list of lenses. Some mad idea that I'd never need another camera or lens again, that being enough. We all know how it works.
     
  16. Pete Askew

    Pete Askew Admin

    The DP3 is a good camera for portraits.
     
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  17. Brian Moore

    Brian Moore Moderator

    Beautiful set, Julian. I love the OOF in the bandsaw shots. (And I'd love to see how they steam those planks! A big long tube attached to a boiler somehow?)
     
  18. Chris Dodkin

    Chris Dodkin West Coast Correspondent

    What a wonderful atmosphere you're captured - looks like a place worth a few more visits?
     
  19. Rob MacKillop

    Rob MacKillop Edinburgh Correspondent

    Yes, back to your images, Julian. I really like this kind of craftsmen and women in-situ shot - not just reportage, but adding your own interpretation as well. I have a friend who makes small boats and kayaks, and also lutes - they are remarkably similar: (apologies for the size of the images - I'm just using a url from his website)

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    The end result:

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  20. Julian de'Courcy

    Julian de'Courcy Well-Known Member

    Thanks Brian. Have not seen them do it for a while but as I recall quite a simple affair. A long steel pipe which the plank can be slid into and steam is pumped in from a small boiler. Not sure even if there is any pressure or not. I think time plays a roll.
    Also I love the way they never start at the bottom or top to lay the planks in a continuous row in a none clinker built boat. They are laid in sequences around the ribbed frame they go onto. So when a plank needs to be put between two planks already in place the skill for me to watch, using an adze hand tool axe , they whittle the plank until it fits so snug and perfectly. A wonder.
    I did mention the skill involved to the son Peter Moore. He came from the angle that he had being building boats since forever with his father, and did not see that skill how I did. For him is seemed he knew how to do it and that was it. I understand that also.

    Thanks Chris. Yes I have in the past taken a few more photos and can anytime if not in the way.

    From 2010 John Moore
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    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr

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    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr

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    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr

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    JOHN MOORE
    by Julian de Courcy, on Flickr
     

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