My High Street

Peter Roberts

Active Member
I've been following the My Street thread with interest. My street is a short cul-de-sac off the High Street here in south-east London. I always take the view that High Streets are interesting places where, if you take the time to look, traces of their past can be found. As such I thought I'd like to take you for a stroll along ours and, in similar vein, call it My High Street.
There's a Burger King, of course, but it used to be a baker's and before that, as you can just see beneath the peeling paint on the clock, a jeweller's.

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There are two very sad looking Grade 2 Listed buildings. Cliefden House is an early 18th century town house that was in its time once a "Preparatory Military Acedemy for Young Gentlemen". The pavement now laps directly onto its frontage but it retains the original doorway. The upper floors are now low-cost offices, one of which unconsciously echoes its past educational use.

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The other kisted building is The Greyhound dating from the early 19th century. Long since closed as a pub and boarded up, the alley at the side has this ghost sign.

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Opposite The Greyhound a road leads down to the station. I love the fussy detailing of this 1930s parade.

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And finally, just past the station is a small park, officially and rather grandly called a pleasuance. Originally it was the grounds of the home (now demolished) of Edith Nesbit, she of The Railway Children fame. The bowling green there has a quaint shelter which privides opportunities for studies in light and shade.

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Minolta Hi-Matic G/Minolta SRT 101b/Fujica ST605N HP5+/FP4+
 
It makes perfect sense to me, Stevenson.
Famous touristy landmarks are so over-documented and often overcrowded that there's no sense of exploration about them. So much more satisfying IMO to wander around mundane places, do a bit of research and discover that they're not so mundane after all.
 
That one with "Commit no nuisance" is talking of old times; the tonalities are great there. The entire series is really talking to me, but the one I named is the one like best. OK, perhaps the last one as well :) .

Thank you!
Thanks, Julian. I'm pleased you liked " Commit no nuisance". Those sort of mundane survivors speak to me of the past far more eloquently than high profile places and sites that wear their 'heritage' value on their sleeve.
 
I’m surprised someone hasn’t painted over the ‘no’, leaving “Commit Nuisance”…I’d be tempted! Only kidding.

Some interesting architectural features there, Peter. Nice to preserve them in photographs too.
 
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I’m surprise someone hasn’t painted over the ‘no’, leaving “Commit Nuisance”…I’d be tempted! Only kidding.

Some interesting architectural features there, Peter. Nice to preserve them in photographs too.
Ironically, recent high winds tore down the Burger King signage and left the roundel hanging precariously. It has since been removed.
The clock, of course, survived unscathed. I rather like that.
 
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